TMTC 20 – Miles Forrest – Part 1

by Charles Max Wood on May 18, 2010

Miles is a great guy. We had a terrific time talking about podcasting, work, life, and programming.

One major theme that keeps coming up in my life and came up in this podcast was the discussion over doing what you love to do.

I met Miles at RailsConf 2009 and at Mountain West RubyConf in March. We discussed doing an interview and in this episode, we wound up interviewing each other.

I think my favorite part of the discussion was the explanation Miles gave of how he formed the Ruby Brigade in his local area.

I’m not really sure how to summarize the content of this interview, so I’ll just let you enjoy it.

Download this Episode

  • http://www.techwatch.co.uk/ Techwatch

    Thanks very much for pointing me to that, pretty interesting stuff about Ruby Brigade

  • http://www.techwatch.co.uk/ Techwatch

    Thanks very much for pointing me to that, pretty interesting stuff about Ruby Brigade

  • http://blog.3dbloke.com 3dBloke

    I was interested in Miles' remark on the use of an IDE vs a simpler text editor. This rang very true. I used my first IDE in the early 1990's (Turbo Pascal) and have since used various Smalltalk (ENVY and Visual Age) and Java (Visual Age and Eclipse) IDEs. In my experience it is best to keep close to the language basics when learning a programming language. It's not just the language, but the command line tools and environment set up. IDEs tend to hide the environment settings or extend them, so a noobie can find it hard to understand the important stuff required to really feel comfortable with the programming language and application deployment.Right now, and the reason I found your podcasts, I am getting into Rails. Currently working through the Pragmatic Programmers' book “Programming Ruby 1.9″. I'm normally a Windows XP user but am using Ubuntu 10.04 (in VirtualBox) for my Ruby work. Being a noobie, I'm sticking with a simple editor, Gedit, which does a fair job for Ruby syntax highlighting.Anyway, I'll be back for more of your 'casts. Keep up the good work :)

  • http://blog.3dbloke.com 3dBloke

    One other comment, Chuck: It would be useful to have web links to the items mentioned in your podcast listed in the notes on teachmetocode.com (sponsors too, of course). Ideally, the list would be in chronological sequence. This could also serve as a kind of overview for people listening to the podcast.

  • http://blog.3dbloke.com 3dBloke

    I was interested in Miles' remark on the use of an IDE vs a simpler text editor. This rang very true. I used my first IDE in the early 1990's (Turbo Pascal) and have since used various Smalltalk (ENVY and Visual Age) and Java (Visual Age and Eclipse) IDEs. In my experience it is best to keep close to the language basics when learning a programming language. It's not just the language, but the command line tools and environment set up. IDEs tend to hide the environment settings or extend them, so a noobie can find it hard to understand the important stuff required to really feel comfortable with the programming language and application deployment.Right now, and the reason I found your podcasts, I am getting into Rails. Currently working through the Pragmatic Programmers' book “Programming Ruby 1.9″. I'm normally a Windows XP user but am using Ubuntu 10.04 (in VirtualBox) for my Ruby work. Being a noobie, I'm sticking with a simple editor, Gedit, which does a fair job for Ruby syntax highlighting.Anyway, I'll be back for more of your 'casts. Keep up the good work :)

  • http://blog.3dbloke.com 3dBloke

    I was interested in Miles' remark on the use of an IDE vs a simpler text editor. This rang very true. I used my first IDE in the early 1990's (Turbo Pascal) and have since used various Smalltalk (ENVY and Visual Age) and Java (Visual Age and Eclipse) IDEs. In my experience it is best to keep close to the language basics when learning a programming language. It's not just the language, but the command line tools and environment set up. IDEs tend to hide the environment settings or extend them, so a noobie can find it hard to understand the important stuff required to really feel comfortable with the programming language and application deployment.

    Right now, and the reason I found your podcasts, I am getting into Rails. Currently working through the Pragmatic Programmers' book “Programming Ruby 1.9″. I'm normally a Windows XP user but am using Ubuntu 10.04 (in VirtualBox) for my Ruby work. Being a noobie, I'm sticking with a simple editor, Gedit, which does a fair job for Ruby syntax highlighting.

    Anyway, I'll be back for more of your 'casts. Keep up the good work :)

  • http://blog.3dbloke.com 3dBloke

    One other comment, Chuck: It would be useful to have web links to the items mentioned in your podcast listed in the notes on teachmetocode.com (sponsors too, of course). Ideally, the list would be in chronological sequence. This could also serve as a kind of overview for people listening to the podcast.

  • http://blog.3dbloke.com 3dBloke

    One other comment, Chuck: It would be useful to have web links to the items mentioned in your podcast listed in the notes on teachmetocode.com (sponsors too, of course). Ideally, the list would be in chronological sequence. This could also serve as a kind of overview for people listening to the podcast.

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