Posts tagged as:

users group

Freelancing is a lot of work. One of the hardest parts is finding clients. I’ve been getting a lot of work lately and I’m going to explain where I get most of my work from.

  • Podcasts and Screencasts – I’ve had several people come to me after listening to my podcasts or watching a screencast and ask me to do some work for them.
  • Referrals – I’ve made several contacts within the community and though some of my clients that have resulted in getting referrals. Make friends. Build your network. It will pay off.
  • Users’ Groups – This is similar to the referrals comment. However, some entrepreneurs and other non-technical people sometimes come to the meetings. You can also meet people who are connected to the local community. It’s amazing to me how much business I’ve got because I met the right person in the local community and they heard about business that didn’t come out to the wider community.
  • Job Boards – This has been the least productive for me. Effectively, you are chasing cold leads. They do work, but the conversion rate is much lower than any of the others I’ve listed.
  • Recruiters – I found my first long term contract through a recruiter. I was referred to him and it worked out really well. I’m still working for this client.

In the podcast I share some other stories and thoughts. Listen and then leave a comment to let me know if there’s anything else you’ve tried that worked for you? I’m also interested in your success stories using some of these ways of finding work.

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Here’s the link to the pledgie where you can help me get to RubyConf. Click here to lend your support to: Send Charles to RubyConf and make a donation at www.pledgie.com !

This week’s episode is an interview with Corey Haines. He’s pretty well known as the Software Journeyman and his coding tours where he traded time pairing on code for room and board.

You can keep up with him at http://coreyhaines.com.

You can also check out the following links for other things he’s doing:

Here’s a link to the Software Craftsmanship Manifesto which is tied a lot to the discussion we had on Software Craftsmanship.

Corey mentioned the Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs – 2nd Edition (MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science)
book, which is a mind-blowing set of instruction and exercises for computer programmers.

We also discussed pairing in relation to the code retreats. Corey mentioned the paper by Arlo Belshee called “Promiscuous Pairing and the Beginner’s Mind”

You can reach Corey on twitter as @coreyhaines and by email at coreyhaines@gmail.com

Finally, checkout the latest news on the XP Universe conference.

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This episode of the teachmetocode podcast, Dave talks us through the process he and Andy Hunt went through in founding the Pragmatic Programmers book series and publishing company. Dave also talks about the the advantages that they have had by not holding onto or being mired down by the way things have always been done and their growth in non-conventional book selling channels.

He also mentioned that if you would like them to come do training where you’re at, contact Mike Clark and find people who are willing to sit in on the course.

I think my favorite part of the interview was his explanation of where the Agile Manifesto came from. We also got to talk about what Agile development really is.

Dave explains the correlation between his musical interests and his programming interests. He figures that at least 30-40% of speakers at any conference would have some sort of musical background. The structure and the way things come together in music actually applies to software. You create patterns or structures that work well together at multiple levels.

Toward the beginning of the Pragmatic Programmers, Dave and Andy recommend learning a new language every year. He discusses his hobby of picking up new programming languages and investing in yourself.

Finally, I asked Dave about running a business and how to get one started. He gave some terrific advice regarding building your own application and business.

He wrapped up the episode by pointing out that programming is exceptionally hard. You have a huge amount of information you have to know in order to get into programming. On top of it, the world is complicated and makes the problems we have to solve hard. So, ultimately, make it fun!

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In this episode, Chad discusses how he broke out of a comfortable job as a forklift operator, which ultimately led to him becoming a programmer.

He discusses his job, Ruby Central, and the Pragmatic Studio as contributions he makes to the community.

We also discuss the ebb and flow of passion for programming and how to avoid burnout on the things that we love. [click to continue…]

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This week I interviewed Chad Fowler. He and several others have helped organize Ruby conferences around the world, most notably RailsConf, RubyConf, and RubyConf India. He has also written The Passionate Programmer and Rails Recipes. Finally, he has contributed to open source projects like RubyGems and Facebooker.
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One of the things that has helped me the most in learning to program well is having a good mentor. I didn’t necessarily choose mine, but I’ve had some excellent mentors. Here’s what made them great for me.

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This episode is my interview with Gregg Pollack. We had a great discussion about podcasting and podcast styles, users’ groups, what makes a good developer, Envy Labs, and a whole lot more. Here are links to several of the things we discuss.

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